Wild Wednesday … Mystery Wildflower!

lavender, wildflower, Sierra, Indian Valley


A lavender wildflower. Does anyone recognize this flower? I took the picture in the Indian Valley of the Northern Sierra.

My forester/botanist office neighbor, Tom, knew it right away. So did Lisa, a FB friend. It is Spiraea douglasii or it’s common names are Douglas’ spiraea, hardhack steeplebush, steeplebush and rose spiraea. It’s a native of the western US and Canada and is commonly used a landscape plant. Who knew?

So Which Will It Bee?

Honey bee, bee, watercolor, watercolour

Here’s one I pulled from the archives of forgotten favorites.

I finally pulled the trigger. I’ve been thinking for some time about marketing prints of my art work, as many of you do. I checked out what was available and checked in with some of you, special thanks to Russel Ray, an excellent photographer in San Diego. After examining many of the sites available I went with Fine Art America. Their business model seems to be a good fit for me.

Click here to see the gallery!

 

I’ve been slowly posting pieces, about two a day. I can already see how difficult it is to stand out on the site, but you can’t sell it if you don’t put it out there. Clearly, promotion is the key. There is so much great art, I am curious to see how this works out. Any advice, comments or experiences are welcome.

Forestry Friday … Big Stumps Talkin’

redwood

A managed redwood forest.

Last week, I was in the redwood country of our coastal mountains. However, I wasn’t down in the parks with the gigantic and ancient trees. As you might imagine, I was in young, working redwood forests.

foxglove, wildflowers

Wild Foxglove

It’s beautiful country and full of surprises. One of the surprises you’ll find in these forests are the old stumps of the ancient forest giants that were logged over a hundred years ago.

stump, redwood, spring board

A giant redwood stump.

These old stumps tell a story of the past. The stump pictured above looks like it has two eyes. The “eye” on the left is a spring-board hole. Way back when, the timber fallers would cut a notch in the tree up above the butt swell. They then wedged a board into the notch. They stood on the board, called a spring-board, to cut the tree down. Two man teams with double bit axes and cross-cut saws fell these trees. The spring boards elevated the fallers up the tree where it wasn’t as thick, making it easier to cut. That’s why these stumps are so tall.

Many of these stumps are charred on the outside. The fires that caused this may have been intentional. It was a common practice of the time, to burn the logging site after the trees were felled. They did this to eliminate slash. After the big trees were cut the slash was so deep it was difficult for a man to get through it. The fire solved this problem and left burned stumps behind.

This redwood stump is fifteen feet across.

This redwood stump is fifteen feet across.

spring board

A spring board hole cut into the stump.

Looking west from the Coast Range toward Humboldt Bay and the Pacific.

Looking west from the Coast Range toward Humboldt Bay and the Pacific.

I did a watercolor of a logger bucking a log with a cross-cut saw, which is showing in my post Misery Whip – The Final. Timber fallers on spring-board would be a good subject for an illustration. I might have to work on that.  Happy Friday.