Douglas Squirrel, Pen and Ink.

I timed my process on this piece.

I was ask once on a webinar how long did it take to do a pen and ink. I wasn’t sure. I rarely take time to complete a piece in one sitting. The process for me is usually broken down into segments done when I have time to draw. This time I wrote down my time as I completed different segments. Here’s how it broke out.

Pencil work took 20 minutes.
Brush pen work 10 minutes. The .3 to .8 ink pen took 20 minutes. The brush pen was a Kuretake 50. I highly recomend this pen.
The fine line of the squirrel work was 1 hour and 45 minutes. The fine line work on the limb was another 2 hours. A .05 pen was used for the fine lines. Staedtler Pigment liners were used for the line work.
The black background shading was done in 1 hour 15 minutes. I used the brush pen and a Copic Wide 110. I spent 10 minutes of finishing work.

The final time was 6 hours and 15 minutes. It was done over approximately 10 sessions averaging 37 minutes each. I drew during lunch breaks, while waiting a doctor appointments, sitting at road construction and in the evening at home. It was not efficient and I probably could have done it in 4 hours without interuption. I draw when I can.

Here’s Doug in his natural habitat.

Douglas Squirrels, (Tamiasciurus douglasii) are small squirrels. They’re smaller than gray squirrels and larger than chipmunks. John Muir described them thus, “He is, without exception, the wildest animal I ever saw,—a fiery, sputtering little bolt of life, luxuriating in quick oxygen and the woods’ best juices.” I think of them as the security alarm of the forest. When one is disturbed it sounds it’s loud chirping alarm and it doesn’t care whether it’s alarming on a person, deer or bear. Once they start, they won’t stop until you leave.

This is his home sweet home.

Back In The Groove

I’ve barely posted the last few years because my computer had become quite geriatric. Most of my posts the last couple of years were from my iPad. The mobile app just doesn’t have all the bells and whistle that the PC has. Now I have a new laptop and it’s time to get more active again. This year has been particularly challenging, but I think getting back to art will be very cathardic.

I had to go to the coast this week. There are hours long construction delays as they work on damage causes by the Monument Fire. There was no cell phone connection, so it gave me a little drawing time.

Traditionally, I haven’t been very good a promoting my art or books. I’m going to try to change that, so here is a link to m Fine Art America site. Please check it out.

They’re running Holiday specials right now for all types of products.

On a side note, while I was in Arcata I went into a local restuarant for a cup of coffee. When I came out there was a murder of crows on my truck. They finally left when I went to got in it. Then a seagull landed on it. I had to look around for Alfred Hitchcock! I thought I was in the movie Birds. Although, the only attack was when the crows pooped all over my truck!

A murder of crow pooping all over my truck.
Begone crows!
Now what?!?

Smoke In The Forecast

We awoke this morning to what we thought was another day of cloud cover. When we went out to air the dogs it was still dark and we could see an orange glow to the Southwest. We climbed into the truck to investigate only to discover it was far to the Southwest. When the morning light brightened the sky we could see the orange hue of smoke filtered light and ash was on everything. A fire blew up overnight in Tehama County and the smoke covered Shasta County by morning. It seems folks all over California woke up to the same and worse conditions. CalFire named this one the 3-4 Fire. Last count had it at 1,000 acres. It’s not the biggest fire. There’s one far worse threatening Vacaville. Say a prayer for the folks down there.

Looking across the pole yard toward the Portal Crane. These pictures didn’t capture how red the sun was.
Red sun over the cogeneration plant early this morning.
Panoramic view taken this afternoon from on top of the chip hopper. The smoke is drifting to the East away from Redding and Anderson.

Riding Shotgun!

During the last few weeks I’ve had a Siggy and Sailor come to work with me while the weather was cooler. Mostly, it’s been too hot, but we’ve had a few nice days.

Siggy’ s doing some quality control one some poles.
Posing in a pine plantation from my reforestation days.
We visited a logging side for student loggers!
We went through the Ponderosa Burn. It was replanted several years ago and the new forest is well on its way.
On a warm day the Northern Sierras we have to be sure a girl can get a drink.
Sailor got to go visit loggers with me on the Westside toward the coast. He patiently waited in the truck so I can talk to the contractors.
Steeper ground requires yarders for logging.
Sailor thought the creek felt pretty good after riding around.

Our Wildflowers Are Ramping Up!

Just a few of our spring flowers to brighten your day. Our wildflowers are coming on nicely. Enjoy! Just click on any image to enlarge the picture.

Truck vs Trucks

Time once again for the Sierra-Cascade Environment and Resouces Fund to raise money for forestry education at the Sierra-Cascade Logging Conference 2020. Mary Livingson and I are ready for our duel art competition. This year the theme is Trucks versus Truck. In one corner we have two Kenworths, one vintage and one new up a against a shiny new Peterbilt. May the best truck or trucks win!

The fundraising dinner has about 50 items to be auctioned. We are in the middle of the auction. Our paintings auction in a unique manner at this event. They auction together. The winning bidder gets to select the painting he/she wants and the other painting goes back on the block, or they can take both paintings at the winning bid price. This is looking like an anything can happen auction. It’s always exciting!

The Auction is tomorrow night. I’d love to know which you like best. We’ll let you know who wins!
Hey, I’ve seen that truck somewhere before!
Hmm…that looks familiar.