The Standoff

This is a true story of an encounter I had with a bear one day. Written and illustrated by Tim Livingston. 

black bear, bear
“This one sized me up trying to decide if I was on his menu.”

The deep impressions in the skid trail were unmistakably that of a large black bear. He had walked this trail so many times that his footsteps had created permanent depressions in the earth. Bears often walk in their same footsteps on their favorite paths. It’s quieter that way. A quiet bear is a well fed bear. This trail hadn’t been used for skidding logs for forty or fifty years judging by the trees growing there. The Bear owned the trail now. 

I came up the trail for the same reason as the bear. I too was hunting. I carried my bow with an arrow nocked at the ready. Trying to be as silent as I could, I stepped where the bear stepped. It was so dry in the August woods that everything cracked and snapped under my feet. I moved along the edge of a steep ravine. Pausing every few steps to listen to the sounds of the forest. Suddenly, crashing sounded through the brush, and then a loud whooshing huff came from across the ravine. There was another huff and then another.  I’d been made.  It was the alarm sound of three black-tail deer.  Deer were what I came for, but my element of surprise was lost.  I couldn’t see any of them through the dense forest of Douglas-fir, pine and oak.  I hoped they might move into an opening so I could. I sat down on the edge of the trail to quietly wait for things to settle down. 

The huffing gradually subsided. The group of deer moved off never once revealing themselves to me. I waited a few more minutes hoping for a straggler.  Then another huff sounded far up the draw. It seemed odd that this new deer would have detected me at that distance.  The huff was followed by more huffing along with crashing in the brush. The crashing didn’t seem like deer. Quickly and quietly, I got to my feet and looked up toward the sound. Soon, a black bear foraging down the ravine came into view. I could tell by its size it was a big boar.


I couldn’t legally hunt this bear because my bear tag had been filled a week before. I didn’t want him to know I was here.  His reaction would alert other deer in the area to my presence. Searching around, there was no way out of the ravine that wouldn’t attract the bear’s attention. Climbing the steep slopes through the leaves and duff would have been very noisy. I waited hoping he might go off on another trail, but he didn’t. He kept coming. I was downwind so he couldn’t smell me. Finally, when our encounter was inevitable, I had to alert the bear to my presence. I picked up a baseball sized rock and hurled it yelling, “Get outta here bear!” My throw missed, and the bear froze in his tracks about fifteen yards away.

When most black bears encounter people they run away fast, but boars in August are different. They are the most dangerous. They’re famished and will attack people, especially in the back country. This one sized me up trying to decide if I was on his menu. He didn’t know what to make of me dressed in camouflage and full face paint. I kept yelling at the bear. Telling him to leave, threatening him and even cussing his mother failed to move him along. The bear tipped his head back and with lips curled out, tried to find my scent on the breeze. Fortunately, the wind was in my favor. The bear was uncertain. Seconds ticked by and then minutes, but the bear wouldn’t budge.  I moved slowly to my right past some tree branches. Now I had a clear shot at him. I knew at this range I wouldn’t miss him, but he could easily reach me before I could nock the next arrow. At that moment my arrow just seemed like a pointy little stick. I didn’t dare turn my back. 

I was down to one last desperate bluff to convince the bear to leave. I raised my bow up as high as I could without taking my finger off the trigger. Then with a guttural yell I lunged toward him. Mama bears often bluff charge people or other bears to make them back off. Any bear should instinctively understand. He didn’t move. I repeated the lunge. Again, the bear didn’t move. He didn’t even twitch. We were now only ten yards apart. What had seemed like an okay idea at the time was suddenly feeling like a really dumb idea. Drawing my bow for what was to come next, I was ready to fire if he took one step in my direction. The seconds slowly ticked by as we stared each other down.  Abruptly, the bear turned and bolted up slope away from me. Then, just as quickly turned back around and sat down. We were now at the more comfortable distance of thirty yards apart and still staring each other down.

Taking a chance, I laid my bow on the ground with the arrow still knocked. Then, slipping the pack off my back, I pulled out my camera. My eyes never left the bear. I took pictures until he moved.  The bear circled to my right behind the cover of some bushes, but kept his distance. I had pushed my luck, so I stowed the camera and put my pack back on. 

The bear was now sitting on a small ridge above me and I had to pass right below him to go on my way. I faced him as I moved slowly past with my bow at the ready. Immediately ahead was another ravine. It was small but deep. I kept looking back to see if the bear had moved. He had not. As I was trying to sort out how to cross the ravine with a big black bear looking down on me, there was loud crashing. I wheeled around to find the bear was gone. He had run down the other side of the ridge.

Seizing the moment, I scrambled through the ravine and quickly moved along the trail. After a short distance I stopped to listen. I could hear the bear on the slope below. He had finally gotten downwind to scent me. I wondered if he would follow now that he knew what he was following. As I went on my way, I stopped to listen every so often. My hunting partner was waiting for me down the trail and she had a bear tag. If the bear followed it would be at his own peril. I would lead the bear to her.

Every little noise after that seemed like it could be the bear, but I never saw him again that day. In seasons to come I’ll return to those mountains and probably to that same ravine. The bear will likely still be around and I may see him again. Hopefully next time he’ll be the hunted.

Wild Wednesday … Downy Woodpecker

I drew this pen and ink while Mary and I were sitting in a ground hunting blind two deer seasons ago. It’s of a female downy woodpecker that I photographed earlier that season. I took it when we were in another blind. If you consider that I completed the drawing while waiting for deer you can probably deduce that no deer were harmed during the drawing of that picture. We always do most of our shooting with a camera.

Downy woodpecker

Downy woodpecker.

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

If you’ve never eaten black bear, let me tell you, it’s delicious!

Sneaking Bliss

We were both hunting turkeys this Spring. There is something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you. Two carnivores hunting in the woods. There’s something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you. We encountered this beautiful beast while hunting Spring turkeys. With Autumn comes a different season.

Orange Glazed Bear

bear meat cut into thin strips
soy sauce
fresh ginger
fresh garlic
ground mustard
flour of your choice for dredging (wheat, cornstarch, rice, etc.)
avocado oil
coconut oil
orange zest
barbecue sauce (homemade or one you like)
sesame seed
green onion

Marinade thin bear strips in a splash of soy sauce, fresh ginger, fresh garlic, with a pinch of ground mustard. Marinade over night or vacuum marinade for 30 minutes. The longer the better.

Place enough flour to coat the meat in a repurposed produce bag. Drain and save marinade juice from meat. Place meat in bag of flour, toss to coat.

Heat a splash almond oil with a dollop of coconut…

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Natural Born Retriever

watercolor, watercolour, pen and ink, golden retriever, pheasant, hunting

Blitz follows her nose to the prize.

Blitz took me pheasant hunting last week.  I think she would drive herself if she had thumbs.  Luckily, she needs a gunner tagging along.  It’s my joy to watch this girl living her bliss.  I captured this hunting moment in watercolor, and pen and ink.

Blitz, pheasants, hunting, pheasant hunting

Blitz with her bag.

Pheasants And The Meaning Of Life

This painting for me is more than a picture of a beautiful rooster pheasant. It is me trying to express the essence of something in my life that is significant.

Pheasant, ring-neck pheasant, watercolor, watercolour, art, , pThis painting has been on the board a long time. It is destined for my office. Oddly, I’ve never hung any of my art in my office. I guess it is about time.

Blitz joyfully returns with a bird.

Blitz joyfully returns with a bird.

Pheasant season ended a few weeks ago. It is a time when our dogs get to live their bliss, as Mary is so fond of putting it, living-bliss. I’ve re-blogged her post, because it is also about the dogs doing what they are born to do. They are working dogs and hunting is their work. They are happiest when they are working. What they do is written in their DNA.

golden retriever, hunting, photography

Teka can’t wait for her turn. She stakes out my truck.

I suppose the same is true for me. If I was plopped down in the American West 200 years ago I think I would have been perfectly happy. Engaging in hunting with dogs, friends and family keeps me connected to my roots and more primitive self.

golden retriever, hunting, photography

Teka was born to hunt birds.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, Pheasant

Teka delivers a pheasant to her person, Doug.

Dogs are pack animals and pheasant hunting helps them live their pack experience. The difference is that we are now their pack, but the satisfaction to them is the same.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, pheasant

Teka relishes bringing the bird to Doug and receiving his appreciation.

If I didn’t have bird dogs I probably wouldn’t bird hunt. The pleasure they bring to it is what makes it complete. These dogs have such heart in what they do. Hunting without them would be like dancing alone.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, pheasant

Blitz on a water retrieve.

Procuring food is such a basic human activity. By acquiring food myself, I appreciate the meal much more. To spend the time hunting and experiencing the joy of success with my partners makes me think about what our hunter gatherer ancestors did on a daily basis. Then to have to go through the process of cleaning and preparing this food, it puts me very in touch with the reality of what was given.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, pheasant

Blitz is happiest while doing her work.

When I hold the pheasant in my hand that I just killed and Blitz just fetched, I experience a blend of feelings. There is joy in the success and satisfaction of providing this meal to my family. There is appreciation for the beauty and for what this creature lost, it’s life. That leaves me with some sadness, but it is the reality of life. It causes me to not take meat in the grocery store for granted.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, pheasant

Blitz has a lively pheasant.

The time out in the field away from the day to day activities is a welcome break to go enjoy a more primal experience. There are things all around to be noticed that add to the richness of this time spent.

geese, Canadian Geese, photography, wildife, nature

Canadian Geese hiding in the grass.

This time means so much when spent with family.

golden retriever, hunting, photography, Pheasant

My oldest son, Chris with his girl Nellie. This will be her last pheasant season.

family, sons, golden retriever, hunting, pheasant

My sons and Nellie.

This is also a time for me to remember my old loyal hunting partners from years past. The ones that gave me so many fond memories. Last year was Hawk’s last season only we didn’t know it at the time. He should have had many more pheasants to retrieve. We miss him very much. Mary posted about him a while back, Her Papa’s Eyes.

golden retriever, hunting, photography

Hawk during his last pheasant season. An old hunting partner remembered.

Coyotes Attack! Oh, nevermind.

Deer, herd, feeding, doe, buck

The deer herd feeding in the hay field.

Something caught my attention, while cruising around the North end of the log decks.  Lots of animals were running in the hay field.  The mill property has a couple hundred acres of hay fields  and ponds on the North end of the log yard.  Each afternoon a large herd of deer comes into the fields to graze.  This morning, they were already in the field and running all over the place.  This is odd behavior for the deer because they weren’t leaving.  They usually wander randomly around the field feeding.  If anyone gets too close they just leave the field for the cover of the nearby Valley Oaks.  This time they were running helter skelter around the field, but not leaving.  I was about a quarter mile away and could not discern what was going on.  I pulled out my camera and zoomed in on the action.  Then I saw the three coyotes.  This is what happened next.

Deer, herd, feeding, doe, buck

Enjoying the sunny morning, the deer placidly graze.  They seem unconcerned  about anything going on around them.

Coyote, Stalking, hunting, deer

Moving in on the deer herd, this coyote was intent on having venison for breafast.

Coyote, hunting, stalking, prey

The coyotes non-chalantly move closer and closer to the herd.

Deer, herd, feeding, doe, buck

The big buck spots the sneaky coyotes.

buck, doe, deer, black-tail deer, prey, predator

Two does and the big buck aren’t going to tolerate the coyotes stalking the herd.

Coyote, doe, deer, buck, stalking, hunting, feeding

This brave doe takes the lead in dealing with the interlopers.

Coyote, doe, deer, buck, stalking, hunting, feeding

The two does surround the lead coyote. The coyote was not expecting this.

coyote, deer, doe, predator, prey, fight back, retreat

The second coyote decides not to stick around. No loyalty amoung coyotes.

Coyote, doe, deer, buck, stalking, hunting, feeding

The coyote is having second thoughts and a venison meal.

Coyote, hunting, stalking, prey

Deciding it isn’t worth it the coyotes back off.

Coyote, hunting, stalking, prey

No venison today for this coyote.

Coyote, hunting, stalking, prey

Perhaps a nice field mouse would be good instead.

Deer, herd, feeding, black-tail deer

With the threat dealt with, the herd goes back to a leisurely breakfast.