Black Tail Redo


deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

This is the tweaked version.

It was bugging me.  Have you ever posted something and when you look at it later, it looks wrong? Something was missing. The deer looked a little chopped off at the feet so I added a bit more foreground.

deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

As it appeared in last weeks post Black Tail In Velvet. What do you think, did it help?

I usually use one of the tricks to get a different view such as looking at it in the mirror, upside down, from across the room, or setting it aside for several days. I guess I have a new one…post it!

Black Tail In Velvet


deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

A Spring black tail buck with horns still in velvet in pen and ink.

This is always busy time of year around here, which is the reason I haven’t posted for awhile. When Fall comes, we disappear into the mountains. It’s our time to put some miles under our boots, over the mountains and through the woods.  This is when we go out to procure some fresh organic protein to get us through the year.

I photographed this buck last Spring.  He was feeding under a blue oak tree. His antlers were still growing and in velvet.

Forestry Friday … From The Woods


Today I’m coming to you from the Trinitys. I happen to have a cell signal so I’m making this post with my iPhone. Many of you may know that we are in a severe drought here in California. You can see by the dust coming off this logging operation how dry things are. Our logging crews are suffering with the dry conditions and the dust. Full fire precautions are in effect. Fire season has been pretty brutal this summer. We’re crossing fingers and hoping for the best for the rest of the logging season.

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Dust is flying, hazy smoke is in the air and Trinity Lake, in the background behind the lower left trees, is down to about 30% capacity. It’s dry dry dry out there.

Sgt Livingston


Lloyd Livingston

Marine Sgt Lloyd Livingston in pen and ink. I used a portrait taken of my dad during WWII.

Today is my dad’s birthday, unfortunately, we lost him several years ago. It seemed like a good time to post his portrait. He served as a Marine in the Pacific during WWII, something I’m very proud of. Happy birthday dad.

I’ve been working on my pen and ink portraits and I have found them to be particularly challenging. They are much more difficult than a squirrel or pine cone. After doing a number of fails, I finally completed one that I thought was suitable for posting. No Forestry Friday post today, but it will be back next week.

Teka and Ruby


Teka

Ruby’s Coarsegold Running Rebel SH, “Teka”

Teka went home to her family about a year ago. I did this drawing before she left. She stayed with us while training. During her time here she completed her AKC Junior and Senior Hunter titles.

Redtails Coarsgold Serrano Sizzle JH, "Ruby"

Redtail’s Coarsgold Serrano Sizzle JH, “Ruby”

Her mother “Ruby” also stayed with us years ago. This is the drawing I did of Ruby when she was here.

This gallery is from Teka’s time with us. Click on the image to enlarge.

Very soon Kinta will be going home to Japan. It has been a wonderful year with him, as was our time with Teka and Ruby.

 

 

Forestry Friday … True Fir


True fir refers to any species of fir that are in the genus of Abies. Species like red fir, Abies magnifica, and white fir, Abies concolor, are true fir. Douglas-fir,  Pseudotsuga menziesii, is not a true fir. The gallery pictures are of a high elevation, old growth true fir forest. This stand is over 6,000 feet elevation. Click the pictures to enlarge.

Forestry Friday … Lodgepole Pine – En Plein Air


One advantage to having a truck for an office, is to take a few minutes in the woods during lunch to engage in a bit of en plein air sketching. En plein air is a french term meaning “in the open air.” It refers to painting or sketching in the outdoors.

logepole pine, cone, pine cone, pen and ink, drawing, sketch, plein air

En plein air pen and ink of a lodgepole pine cone.

Here is some of our local lodgepole pine.

Click on the images to enlarge them.

Forestry Friday … Fire From The Sky!


In this year of drought, our forests are a tinder box waiting for a spark. That spark came from the sky on the last day of July. It reached 108 F in the valley. A major lightning storm rolled across the North State and left numerous forest fires in its wake.

wildfire, Forest fire

Looking east toward Burney. On the right is smoke from the Day Fire and on the right is the Bald Mountain Fire.

Bald Mountain Fire

Bald Mountain.

A huge thundercloud forms about The Bald Mountain Fire.

A huge thundercloud forms above the Bald Mountain Fire. Burney Mountain on the right, has a fire lookout on its peak.

The cloud above the fire continued to grow all day.

The cloud above the fire continued to grow all day as the fire exploded in size. These clouds create erratic winds that cause the fire to spot.

The air tankers bombed the fire throughout the daylight hours.

The air tankers bombed the fires throughout the daylight hours. This S2 is on its way to the Coffee Fire.

To the west another group of fires was burning.

More fires were burning to the west. This column was from the Coffee Creek Fire.

Eiler Fire

A new fire called the Eiler Fire took off on the second day. It’s was close to the Bald Mountain Fire. The two fires were threatening the town of Burney. From the valley in Anderson, we could see at least six major smoke columns in all directions.

The beginning of the week brought us a rare and very wet cold front. The rain helped the firefighter get a handle on many of the fires.

The beginning of the week brought us a rare and very wet cold front. The rain helped the firefighters get a handle on many of the fires. The same storm created flash floods and mud slides in Southern California.

Wildfire Sunsets are a silver lining.

Wildfire sunsets are a silver lining.

Most of the east side fires are under control now, but several fires in the Klamath Mountains are still burning. We still have a long way to go to reach the end of fire season.

Fine With Phoebe


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The Black Phoebe in pen and ink.

Every year we have an addition built on our home. We don’t build it ourselves. The black phoebe families build their mud and twig nests under our western roof peaks when they come to stay.

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This beautifully beak crafted addition to our home is a classic phoebe nest.

pheobeNest02

At a different roof peak, another phoebe family built their new nest on top of last seasons nest. I think this addition was built by the Picasso of the Phoebe world.

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These little flycatchers strike fear in the hearts of mosquitoes! They’re always welcome moving in with us. Besides, I don’t mind a little mud.

“It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.”
 Aesop