Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner


foresterartist:

If you’ve never eaten black bear, let me tell you, it’s delicious!

Originally posted on Sneaking Bliss:

We were both hunting turkeys this Spring. There is something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you. Two carnivores hunting in the woods. There’s something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you. We encountered this beautiful beast while hunting Spring turkeys. With Autumn comes a different season.

Orange Glazed Bear

bear meat cut into thin strips
soy sauce
fresh ginger
fresh garlic
ground mustard
flour of your choice for dredging (wheat, cornstarch, rice, etc.)
avocado oil
coconut oil
orange zest
barbecue sauce (homemade or one you like)
sesame seed
green onion

Marinade thin bear strips in a splash of soy sauce, fresh ginger, fresh garlic, with a pinch of ground mustard. Marinade over night or vacuum marinade for 30 minutes. The longer the better.

Place enough flour to coat the meat in a repurposed produce bag. Drain and save marinade juice from meat. Place meat in bag of flour, toss to coat.

Heat a splash almond oil with a dollop of coconut…

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Wild Wednesday … Mystery Wildflower!


lavender, wildflower, Sierra, Indian Valley


A lavender wildflower. Does anyone recognize this flower? I took the picture in the Indian Valley of the Northern Sierra.

My forester/botanist office neighbor, Tom, knew it right away. So did Lisa, a FB friend. It is Spiraea douglasii or it’s common names are Douglas’ spiraea, hardhack steeplebush, steeplebush and rose spiraea. It’s a native of the western US and Canada and is commonly used a landscape plant. Who knew?

Forestry Friday … Mountain Thunderstorms


Looking across Indian Valley at a mountain thunderstorm. We’ve had many storms, already this year. Fortunately, they’ve been moisture laden. Dry lightening is a huge concern in the Sierra Nevada, especially in a dry year like this.  Our long term weather prediction is for high thunderstorm activity in July and August. Hopefully, a healthy dose of rain goes with it.

Lake Almanor

A downpour coming across Lake Almanor.

Rain2

Unfortunately, thunderstorms are so spotty when it comes to rain. As of yesterday “sleepers” started popping up all over Northern California. The sleepers are the smoldering lightning strikes that flare into a full blown fires when the temperatures rise and humidity falls.

Rain1

Most of the lightning fires have already been extinguished by the fire services, but there are always a few that get away. Today we are suppose to reach 103 F in the valley and 108 F tomorrow. Despite the rain, it’s fire season in Northern California.

Forestry Friday … Spotted Pine Sawyer


Pine Sawyer Beetle, pen and ink, pen, drawing

The Spotted Pine Sawyer in pen and ink.

PineSawyer3

The spotted pine sawyer beetle is in the longhorn beetle genus. If you hang out around enough log landings you’re bound to see them. This one flew into my truck.

PineSawyer2

Be careful how you pick them up. They have strong mandibles and are happy to bite you.

They reproduce in dead and dying trees. Their larvae will bore into the log, thus reducing its value.

Pine Sawyer Grub, larva, larval

The larval form is a borer that damages the wood.

PineSawyer1

A log deck in the wood is a natural attractant for the beetles. If the logs sit in the woods too long the beetles will get into them.

PineSawyer4

Spotted Pine Sawyer, Monochamus galloprovicialis.