So Which Will It Bee?


Honey bee, bee, watercolor, watercolour

Here’s one I pulled from the archives of forgotten favorites.

I finally pulled the trigger. I’ve been thinking for some time about marketing prints of my art work, as many of you do. I checked out what was available and checked in with some of you, special thanks to Russel Ray, an excellent photographer in San Diego. After examining many of the sites available I went with Fine Art America. Their business model seems to be a good fit for me.

Click here to see the gallery!

 

I’ve been slowly posting pieces, about two a day. I can already see how difficult it is to stand out on the site, but you can’t sell it if you don’t put it out there. Clearly, promotion is the key. There is so much great art, I am curious to see how this works out. Any advice, comments or experiences are welcome.

Forestry Friday … Burn Baby Burn!


There’s fire in the woods again!

slash, logging, forestry, burning, controlled burning, prescribed burning, fuel reduction

Burning slash in a logging unit. A forester favorite Fall pastime.

Not like the Summer wildfires this time. This burning is for fuel reduction after logging. It’s part of our Fall preparation for tree planting. We prefer chipping slash and hauling it to the co-generation plant where it can be turned into electricity. In some areas that option isn’t available so we have to burn the slash on site. Getting rid of the slash reduces the fuel load for future wildfires that may occur. It also releases nutrients into the soil in the form of ash. Those nutrients give a boost to the young seedlings that will be planted at the site in the Spring.

broadcast burn, forestry, burn piles

On flat ground the slash is often piled for burning. In this unit the entire site is burned, which is called a broadcast burn.

We aren’t trying to get rid of all debris within units, but we want to reduce it to a reasonable level. A certain amount of slash and debris left unburned acts as impediments to erosion. Over time it breaks down adding organic material back into the soils. However, too much debris creates a fuel load that will support an aggressive wildfire.

inversion, smoke, prescribed fire, burning operation, forestry

This smoke column rises over Trinity Lake and has reached an inversion layer causing the smoke to flatten out.

Burning is only allowed on specific days when weather conditions are right. We avoid conditions that are too dry in which fire can escape. We also have to be aware of what direction the smoke is being carried on the wind to avoid smoking out populated areas. In California we’re required to prepare smoke management plans to determine what conditions are appropriate for burning as to not create a smoke hazard for local areas.

golden retriever

I had a companion on this day. Tessa, our friend’s dog, got to be a forester’s dog for a day.

Fall is traditionally incredibly busy around here and this season has been no different. Things are starting to wind down so hopefully there will more time for posting.

 

Test Driving My New Brush Pen


 

brush pen, pen and ink, deer, drawing, black tail deer

This black tail deer was done as a bit of practice with a new brush pen. This drawing is not my usual style, but I wanted to use it by itself. I typically use the brush pen in concert with my other pens.

My birthday was this month and Mary got me a new pen. I pick out the Kuretake No. 50 brush pen. I went with this one because it has natural bristles and is refillable. I’ve been trying out a number of different single use pens and have really enjoyed them, but I wanted something better. This pen is a hot rod!

Kuretake No. 50 Fountain Hair Brush Pen - Sable Hair - Black Body + Gold Accents + Refill - KURETAKE DW141-50

The pen comes with in a nice wooden box with three ink cartridges. I haven’t tried these cartridges yet. Instead I purchased the Platinum Converter, a refillable cartridge, and a bottle of Platinum Carbon Ink. I pick this ink because it is very water-resistant and can be used with watercolor.

I’ve been enjoying this pen a lot, but I need to get more practice with it. I find using a brush pen is a lot different from a watercolor brush, very unforgiving. I suppose it’s made more difficult more by the ink and not the pen.

Black Tail Redo


deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

This is the tweaked version.

It was bugging me.  Have you ever posted something and when you look at it later, it looks wrong? Something was missing. The deer looked a little chopped off at the feet so I added a bit more foreground.

deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

As it appeared in last weeks post Black Tail In Velvet. What do you think, did it help?

I usually use one of the tricks to get a different view such as looking at it in the mirror, upside down, from across the room, or setting it aside for several days. I guess I have a new one…post it!

Black Tail In Velvet


deer, black tail deer, buck, Columbia black tail deer

A Spring black tail buck with horns still in velvet in pen and ink.

This is always busy time of year around here, which is the reason I haven’t posted for awhile. When Fall comes, we disappear into the mountains. It’s our time to put some miles under our boots, over the mountains and through the woods.  This is when we go out to procure some fresh organic protein to get us through the year.

I photographed this buck last Spring.  He was feeding under a blue oak tree. His antlers were still growing and in velvet.

Forestry Friday … From The Woods


Today I’m coming to you from the Trinitys. I happen to have a cell signal so I’m making this post with my iPhone. Many of you may know that we are in a severe drought here in California. You can see by the dust coming off this logging operation how dry things are. Our logging crews are suffering with the dry conditions and the dust. Full fire precautions are in effect. Fire season has been pretty brutal this summer. We’re crossing fingers and hoping for the best for the rest of the logging season.

photo (4)
Dust is flying, hazy smoke is in the air and Trinity Lake, in the background behind the lower left trees, is down to about 30% capacity. It’s dry dry dry out there.

Sgt Livingston


Lloyd Livingston

Marine Sgt Lloyd Livingston in pen and ink. I used a portrait taken of my dad during WWII.

Today is my dad’s birthday, unfortunately, we lost him several years ago. It seemed like a good time to post his portrait. He served as a Marine in the Pacific during WWII, something I’m very proud of. Happy birthday dad.

I’ve been working on my pen and ink portraits and I have found them to be particularly challenging. They are much more difficult than a squirrel or pine cone. After doing a number of fails, I finally completed one that I thought was suitable for posting. No Forestry Friday post today, but it will be back next week.

Teka and Ruby


Teka

Ruby’s Coarsegold Running Rebel SH, “Teka”

Teka went home to her family about a year ago. I did this drawing before she left. She stayed with us while training. During her time here she completed her AKC Junior and Senior Hunter titles.

Redtails Coarsgold Serrano Sizzle JH, "Ruby"

Redtail’s Coarsgold Serrano Sizzle JH, “Ruby”

Her mother “Ruby” also stayed with us years ago. This is the drawing I did of Ruby when she was here.

This gallery is from Teka’s time with us. Click on the image to enlarge.

Very soon Kinta will be going home to Japan. It has been a wonderful year with him, as was our time with Teka and Ruby.

 

 

Forestry Friday … True Fir


True fir refers to any species of fir that are in the genus of Abies. Species like red fir, Abies magnifica, and white fir, Abies concolor, are true fir. Douglas-fir,  Pseudotsuga menziesii, is not a true fir. The gallery pictures are of a high elevation, old growth true fir forest. This stand is over 6,000 feet elevation. Click the pictures to enlarge.