Forestry Friday … The Ride Along

Forestry, mentoring, education

The truck is fueled and ready. Do you want to go for a ride along?

Ralph was a state forester. He’s retired now, but he’s been a friend throughout my career. He gave me my first ride along.

When I met Ralph, I was a firefighter in the summer and attending community college.  I declared my Forestry Major and was preparing to transfer to Humboldt State University. I had not taken any forestry classes yet. That would start the next year. I didn’t have much forestry work experience. I knew Ralph from my job at the fire station. I asked if I could ride along with him for a day. He gladly took me up on it. I learned a lot from Ralph.

Forestry, mentoring, education

Jaime spent the day exploring a little West Coast forestry.

The other day I took a young woman, named Jaime, for a ride along. She’s contemplating her next career move. She is a cousin of a close friend.

The night before, Mary and I visited with our friends, Jaime, and her father. We had a wonderful conversation.  Jaime recently completed her Bachelor degree at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. Now she was considering going for an environmental law degree. Mary and I were both thinking, She needs to go for a ride along. When offered, she leaped at the chance.

The next day we started out with an introduction to our company’s head research scientist, CJ. These two women hit it off famously. After an insightful conversation about environmental science, careers and education, we headed out to the mill.

We toured the mill complex where Jaime started out watching the pole plant processing logs. Next, we went through the sawmill. She asked a ton of questions about the process and took a few pictures to send to her friends back in North Carolina. After the mill tour it was back to the truck.

Forestry, mentoring, education

She saw some modern logging technology in this tree shear.

We headed out to look at the timberlands. Our conversation centered on forestry practices, land management and environmental issues.  We started near Shingletown, looking at forestry practices, and ended the day at the Ponderosa Burn, talking about fire restoration.

Forestry, mentoring, education

Valley Quail in the Ponderosa Burn.

Now, if I sound like the wise professional bestowing my vast knowledge from on high, let me correct that right now. This education process is a two way street. Our conversations weren’t all about forestry. I learned about all manner of issues important to her generation. We both had a fun and instructive day.

Forestry, mentoring, education

Channeling her inner Vanna White, Jaime shows off some old time milling technology in this teepee burner.

Making time for young people to go for a ride along or job shadow for a day is time well spent. A day job shadowing does something for them that a semester of school doesn’t do.  It gives them a big picture of the profession. As professionals we benefit from this time too. We’re never too old to learn and they too have a lot to share.

Forestry, mentoring, education

Jaime’s career is a like this little pine tree, just starting out.

Blitz, golden retriever

Blitz likes a good ride along, but don’t take her seat!

16 thoughts on “Forestry Friday … The Ride Along

  1. A couple weeks ago I got to go out to the bush with my brother, a logging contractor. I had a great day!. We started out at 6am and drove for two hours down a forest road, meeting many loaded off-highway trucks. My brother showed me his entire “show,” and explained how it all works together; loading the trucks, processing the logs, skidding and stacking them in decks, cutting trees with feller-bunchers and building the roads . We even did some snowshoeing. I spent the day taking photos of his machines and the general view of the land. We got a load of firewood for our mom, cut by a processor and then drove back.
    I always love riding along!

    Like

  2. What a great opportunity for you both! I also love the transition from your friend and mentor, to this wonderful young lady. Taking what you’ve been given and reaching back to bring someone else along. It’s what a good life is all about!

    Like

  3. What a great experience for Jaime. It seems too often that people with responsibility for something have no practical real life experience in it. Book learning can only go so far and we must learn how to effectively apply what we “know”. I once read someone say that the hardest thing she had to deal with was a bureaucrat who had no practical experience, just theory and regulation. Without any real life reference points, all he had to rely on was the “rule” and boy did he hold onto that.

    Like

Let me know what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s