The Arrowhead

Water Break

During my travels today, I stopped at a spring, so Blitz and Nellie could get a drink and cool off.  They were busy running around, swimming, drinking, and eating some grass.  Then, I spotted a small shiny black object in the dirt.  Upon closer inspection, I saw that it was an obsidian arrowhead. I have no idea how long it had been there, maybe hundreds or thousands of years.  The tip was chipped.  It had probably struck a rock or bone when it had been shot at it’s prey many years ago.  I imagine that once it was chipped the hunter removed it from its shaft to replace it with a new point.  It was probably dropped, lost and forgotten, until now.  As I looked at the features and the delicate workmanship of this point I can see that the maker took great pride in his work.  It was shaped with precise care.  The joy in the workmanship of this little obsidian projectile point was evident.  It was a utilitarian object, but also a piece of art.  I took a picture of the arrowhead so that I could share it on this blog.  It is little piece of art in the forest, and history.  In California we’re not allowed to collect such artifacts.  Maybe in the future, someone else will see it and it will tell them it’s story, as it told me today.  I can only imagine, if I had met the maker of this arrowhead that he would have said to me, “hey check this one out, pretty cool isn’t it.”  I would have to agree.  Like a blog from the past, I was fortunate to take this picture so that I could share it with all of you and I hope you enjoy it.

Obsidian Arrowhead

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